There Is A Light... lyrics analysis

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Postby Cracked Pleasures » Sat Apr 22, 2006 7:19 pm

Take me out, tonight
where there's music and people and they're young and alive
Driving in your car, I never ever want to go home
Because I haven't got one, anymore
Take me out, tonight
Take me anywhere, I don't care, I don't care
Driving in your car, oh please don't drop me home
Because it's not my home, it's their home
and I'm welcome no more

And if a doubledecker bus, crashes into us
To die by your side, is such a heavenly way to die
And if a ten-ton truck, kills the both of us
To die by your side, well the pleasure and privilege is mine

Take me out tonight
Take me anywhere, I don't care, I don't care
And in the darkened underpass, I thought: oh God, my chance has come at last
But then a strange fear gripped me and I just couldn't ask
Take me out tonight
Take me anywhere, I don't care, I don't care
Driving in your car, oh please don't drop me home
because I haven't got one, no I haven't got one

And if a doubledecker bus, crashes into us
To die by your side, is such a heavenly way to die
And if a ten-ton truck, kills the both of us
To die by your side, well the pleasure and privilege is mine

There is a light that never goes out...





There Is A Light... is probably one of the best workpieces of the typical macabre yet deeply romantic visions of Morrissey where gloom and romance collide.

The story tells how the person doesn't want to return home, as he doesn't feel at home in the place that he in theory belongs, so he takes off with the woman (man?) he loves, destination unknown, with just each other as certainties.

The morbid-macabre element is that the person doesn't express his feelings by wishing for a lifetime by her side, but by wishing to die in her arms. Yet at the same time the whole idea of running off with the person you love, is deeply romantic. The Smiths combine feelings of longing, affection and gloom in a marvellous way.

The song also expresses a theme that often comes back in Smiths songs: loneliness, and not managing to express your feelings: the character wishes to declare his love and in the middle of his romantic experience he wants to do it, but then a strange fear comes up and he swallows his words again... This (along with other Smiths songs about loneliness, not fitting in and being misunderstood) is why me and other Aspergers sufferers often recognise ourselves in the lyrics of Morrissey.



The song has different possible interpretations: it could be about the romantic ideal of just leaving together with the person you love, but another often heard interpretation is that it is about prostitution: the lonely person seeking the missed affection in the arms of a callgirl, meanwhile still feeling depressed and wishing to die in her arms. If the latter interpretation would be correct, the 'light' that never goes out could refer to the neon lights on the brothel windows.

Yet another possibility -although less likely correct- is that the 'light that never goes out' has to be taken as a metaphor: a 'light' is an intelligent person, and Morrissey had only few social contacts in his youth and rarely wanted to go out in the nightlife.

I think the interpretation of the escape together with the one you love, is the most likely one. The 'light that never goes out' could represent the love that doesn't die, or the feeling of hope/longing that can never be broken down.
Last edited by Cracked Pleasures on Sun Apr 23, 2006 10:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Keep it flaming your desire, always rising higher - Aim for stars and hit the sky
(Echo & The Bunnymen - Evergreen, 1996)

Capital punishment = murder

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Postby Mr-Shankly » Sat Apr 22, 2006 10:04 pm

Thats an interesting analysis. Hope to see you around the forum.
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Postby Melanie » Sun Apr 23, 2006 3:38 pm

That kept me reading.
Thanks for sharing.
<!--fonto:Book Antiqua--><span style="font-family:Book Antiqua"><!--/fonto--><!--sizeo:2--><span style="font-size:10pt;line-height:100%"><!--/sizeo--><!--coloro:#6600CC--><span style="color:#6600CC"><!--/coloro--><!--fonto:Arial Narrow--><span style="font-family:Arial Narrow"><!--/fonto-->i am a poor, freezingly cold soul
so far from where i intended to go...<!--fontc--></span><!--/fontc-->
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Postby stanyewest » Sun Apr 23, 2006 6:32 pm

<!--quoteo--><div class='quotetop'>QUOTE</div><div class='quotemain'><!--quotec-->The morbid-macabre element is that the person doesn't express his feelings by wishing for a lifetime by her side, but by wishing to die in her arms. Yet at the same time the whole idea of running off with the person you love, is deeply romantic. The Smiths combine feelings of longing, affection and gloom in a marvellous way.<!--QuoteEnd--></div><!--QuoteEEnd-->-Were the highlight for me, a very clever analyssis combining good analytical points with personal views about how it made you feel well done.
most people gaze not into the future or the past;they explore neither truth nor lies. they gaze at the TV.
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Postby Lazy Dyke » Sun Apr 23, 2006 10:35 pm

stanye west wrote:<!--quoteo--><div class='quotetop'>QUOTE</div><div class='quotemain'><!--quotec-->The morbid-macabre element is that the person doesn't express his feelings by wishing for a lifetime by her side, but by wishing to die in her arms. Yet at the same time the whole idea of running off with the person you love, is deeply romantic. The Smiths combine feelings of longing, affection and gloom in a marvellous way.
-Were the highlight for me, a very clever analyssis combining good analytical points with personal views about how it made you feel well done.
<!--QuoteEnd--></div><!--QuoteEEnd-->

I always feel you can't call the person Morrissey sings about a specific gender though, I invision it as a male. Not sure why.. but thats the way I see it.

Very good analysis though.
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Postby elko » Sun Apr 23, 2006 10:46 pm

CP, hope you don't mind, I corrected a couple of the lyrics in your post.

To be honest I can't sum up this song, kinda hard to analyse it when it's deliberately left so open.
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Postby atomium » Tue May 09, 2006 7:13 pm

Great analyses!
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Postby Cracked Pleasures » Sun May 28, 2006 7:50 pm

I add one more thing: "Take me out tonight to where there's music and people and they're young and alive" -- this feeling is something I experience myself a lot and I think it's something lot of Aspies will relate to: you feel isolated and lonely and just go where there's people, but once you're there you find no one to communicate with or who is up for a serious chat, so you just go back home in disillusionment. But still you wish for some form of social interaction, so you're drawn back to those same places (despite earlier bad experiences) because you just want to be where the people are.

Morrissey captures it all so well...
Keep it flaming your desire, always rising higher - Aim for stars and hit the sky
(Echo & The Bunnymen - Evergreen, 1996)

Capital punishment = murder

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